Before-and-after photos show how deserted California has become since going on lockdown

A composite image of Venice Beach Boardwalk in California. A composite image of Venice Beach Boardwalk in California.
A composite image of Venice Beach Boardwalk in California.
Mario Tama/Getty / Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty
  • On March 20, California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered a state-wide lockdown to try stop the coronavirus from spreading. There's been no confirmation when the lockdown will end.
  • According to the Los Angeles Times, California has 3,154 confirmed cases and 67 deaths, as of March 26.  
  • Popular spots like Venice Beach, Santa Monica Pier, and the flower fields in Carlsbad are now deserted.
  • These before-and-after photos show what California looks like on lockdown. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

AFTER: The order appears to have worked. On March 25 the beach looked mostly empty.

Deserted Santa Monica beach coronavirus
Santa Monica beaches on the Pacific Ocean are empty after California issued a stay-at-home order due to coronavirus on March 25.
Lucy Nicholson / Reuters

BEFORE: Santa Monica Pier, which is about 1,600 feet long, gets more than 7 million tourists each year.

People crowd Santa Monica Pier
People crowd Santa Monica Pier in Santa Monica, California, June 30, 2011.
Jonathon Alcorn / AFP / Getty

Source: CNN

AFTER: But as of March 25, the pier and all of its rides, including what CNN described as the "iconic red and yellow Ferris wheel," were deserted after people were ordered to stay home.

Deserted Santa Monica Pier coronavirus
The Santa Monica pier and beaches on the Pacific Ocean are empty after California issued a stay-at-home order due to coronavirus on March 25.
Lucy Nicholson / Reuters

Source: CNN

AFTER: But it's closed now. Here it is deserted on a grey day on March 18.

Oceanside pier empty coronavirus
An empty pedestrian pier is shown during the global outbreak of the coronavirus in Oceanside, California, on March 18.
Mike Blake / Reuters

BEFORE: In spring, people flock to the flower fields in Carlsbad to see them bloom. In total, about 650,000 people visit them every year.

Tourists at California flowers
A trailer full of visitors is towed around a field of Giant Tecolote Ranunculus flowers by a tractor as laborers work at the Flower Fields in Carlsbad, in 2013.
Mike Blake / Reuters

Source: San Diego Union Tribune

AFTER: Carlsbad officials had planned a number of events to use the fields to bolster tourism, but on March 25 the fields were empty due to the coronavirus.

Empty flower fields California
Fields of flowers usually crowded with tourists and onlookers sit empty during the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease in Carlsbad, California, on March 25.
Mike Blake / Reuters

Source: San Diego Union Tribune

BEFORE: Pier 39, which is a part of San Francisco's Fisherman's Wharf, is usually filled with people. The wharf's management says it gets about 11 million visitors each year.

Pier 39, Fisherman's Wharf in 2011.
Pier 39, Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco in 2011.
Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group / Getty

Source: San Francisco Curbed

AFTER: But by March 17, it was nearly empty.

Deserted pier 39 coronavirus
A nearly empty Pier 39 is seen during day one of the citywide shelter in place order amid the outbreak of coronavirus on March 17.
Stephen Lam / Reuters

AFTER: On March 25, there was only a single man crossing the boulevard, and the Pantages Theatre was closed.

Deserted Hollywood Boulevard coronavirus
A man crosses the unusually quiet Hollywood Boulevard near the shuttered Pantages Theatre as the coronavirus pandemic continues on March 25, 2020 in Los Angeles, California.
Mario Tama/Getty

BEFORE: Los Angeles' Dodger Stadium has a capacity of 56,000. It gets packed. This was a large crowd for a game between the LA Dodgers and the Boston Red in 2018.

Busy Dodger stadium
A packed Dodger Stadium when the LA Dodgers defeat Boston Red in 2018.
Visions of America/Universal Images Group / Getty

Source: Los Angeles Times

AFTER: Here's Dodger Stadium on what was meant to be day before opening day, on March 25. It's been postponed, and the stadium is empty.

GettyImages 1214782881
Exterior pictures on the eve of Major League Baseball's opening day which has been postponed due to the coronavirus at Dodger Stadium on March 25.
Harry How/Getty

Source: MSN.com

AFTER: By March 23, there was barely anyone in sight.

Venice Beach deserted coronavirus
Many shops stand shuttered on the Venice Beach boardwalk on March 23 in Venice, California.
Mario Tama/Getty
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SEE ALSO: Before-and-after photos show how fear of the coronavirus has emptied out New York's biggest landmarks

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